Skip to content

Current issues in shipping

The role of maritime transport is more important than ever in supporting the resilience of national economies during the current crisis. Below current issues paint a picture of the status quo and how we at ICS are supporting our members and our seafarers, who have been heavily affected by the pandemic, COVID-19 related restrictions leaving 400,000 seafarers stranded at sea.

We have also included efforts to decarbonise shipping, including the ongoing negotiations at the UN International Maritime Organization (IMO), the radical industry proposal for a USD 5 billion fund to accelerate the R&D of zero-carbon technologies and many more.

Key Issues

Filter by:

Showing 21 – 30 of 34 results

Reducing GHG: time for a propulsion revolution

Ambitious IMO targets to cut GHG emissions 50% by 2050, due to be revised upwards in 2023,will require a fourth revolution in shipping propulsion, based on new fuels and technology

Current Issue

Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems

Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems, or ‘scrubbers’, offer an attractive alternative to low sulphur fuels but the industry needs to take a global approach based on clear scientific data

Current Issue

Marine insurance issues

Insurers are increasingly engaging with regulatory issues in shipping, as shown by discussions over the 2020 sulphur cap.

Current Issue

Changes to the UN Law of the Sea

A UN initiative aimed at regulating fishing, energy and economic activity on the High Seas could have unintended consequences for shipping

Current Issue

Reviewing the Minimum Wage

A periodic review of ratings’ salaries takes into account the value of the US dollar versus the cost of living in seafarer countries, in an effort to provide a fair wage for the world’s sailors

Current Issue

2020 Global Sulphur Cap

The introduction of a global sulphur cap has brought radical change to the industry, raising questions about fuel availability, safety and compatibility.

Current Issue

Action on Plastics

While the majority of unwanted plastic in the sea originates from land, shipping also has a part to play in eliminating this hazard to marine and human life

Current Issue